ShelleyRae O'Connor

Crisis Prevention & Restoration


CPR4Biz – Emergency Preparedness, Disaster Management and Risk Reduction

There is no short cut, business decision makers have to spend time preparing for the possibility of catastrophe. It could be a natural event, it could have a human origin or it could be medical. Regardless, an owner, manager or executive has to think about the many events that could either temporarily or permanently interrupt their business. In other words, a business must consider what threats exists to their normal, profitable operations. The task may initially appear overwhelming. However, it is just a matter of considering what the business does; where it does it; how it does it; and why it does it; then, examine what could happen to stop any of these things.




Schedule - 1 to 1

Schedule - Insurance Presentation

Schedule - Top Reasons Businesses Don't Plan Presentation

Order -
Business & Income Resiliency Mini Assessment and Plan

Order -
Immediate Action - Recovery - Non Bio-Hazard






This myth is one that channel partners hear all the time, and it is completely off base. Although IT is a major component of any Disaster Recovery plan, businesses comprise many more components (buildings, people, processes and so on). Because there is so much to cover in a Disaster Recovery plan, people assigned to a project often don’t know where to start, and they put DR on the back burner (only to become high priority when disaster strikes). Having a trusted partner, like CPR, can help your 
organization develop a comprehensive project plan, whether it’s custom-made for your business or a tried-and-true plan that is modified to fit your organization.
Businesses that prepare have prepared employees.
Making disaster preparedness a part of our regular lives keeps it simple and cost effective. 

There are literally thousands of subtle, simple and economical things we can do to drastically
improve our emergency readiness. The notion that it might be expensive or complicated has 
come from companies that aggressively market high-priced, unnecessary gear.
Truth: With the right mix of investments, incentives and leadership, 
a business can radically reduce its risk of disasters.

What needs to happen to ensure risk and suffering is minimized 
for those affected by natural disasters?
    The scope will not be known.  The exact situation will not be known until well into the event.
 Some of the worst-hit areas might be the last to be responded to.  Decisions will have to be  made in the absence of complete information.
    Communications will fail.  There are over 30 types of communications failures; most large  emergencies will suffer multiple types of communication failure.   From infrastructure  damage, to system overload, to information not getting to the person or not arriving in  time to misunderstanding what someone else said, communications will fail.
    Situation constantly changing.  What you are responding to might have significantly changed by  the time you actually arrive on scene.  The events of 9/11 offer an example of how quickly  things can change from the start to the finish of an event.
    Emergency services will be affected.  A police car is no better than a passenger vehicle when whiteout conditions occur on a highway.   Flooding blocks the road for an ambulance as  much as any vehicle.  A fire hall is equally likely to be damaged by a tornado as any structure.
    Unusual response required.  If the emergency services are affected, then alternate strategies might be required.  Disasters commonly have pictures of someone doing something unexpected, but  successfully, when your regular response isn’t working.
    Massive Convergence. Convergence of organizations, volunteers, off-duty personnel, government officials and outside media can be truly breathtaking, with hundreds of organizations arriving for a major emergency, let alone a disaster.   Emergency services are often unprepared for the size of the response in support of their operation.  

ShelleyRae O'Connor

Crisis Prevention & Restoration

Prevention and Mitigation


CPR4Biz – Emergency Preparedness, Disaster Management and Risk Reduction

There is no short cut, business decision makers have to spend time preparing for the possibility of catastrophe. It could be a natural event, it could have a human origin or it could be medical. Regardless, an owner, manager or executive has to think about the many events that could either temporarily or permanently interrupt their business. In other words, a business must consider what threats exists to their normal, profitable operations. The task may initially appear overwhelming. However, it is just a matter of considering what the business does; where it does it; how it does it; and why it does it; then, examine what could happen to stop any of these things.




Schedule - 1 to 1

Schedule - Insurance Presentation

Schedule - Top Reasons Businesses Don't Plan Presentation

Order -
Business & Income Resiliency Mini Assessment and Plan

Order -
Immediate Action - Recovery - Non Bio-Hazard






Let's Chat

Myths vs Truths

This myth is one that channel partners hear all the time, and it is completely off base. Although IT is a major component of any Disaster Recovery plan, businesses comprise many more components (buildings, people, processes and so on). Because there is so much to cover in a Disaster Recovery plan, people assigned to a project often don’t know where to start, and they put DR on the back burner (only to become high priority when disaster strikes). Having a trusted partner, like CPR, can help your 
organization develop a comprehensive project plan, whether it’s custom-made for your business or a tried-and-true plan that is modified to fit your organization.
Businesses that prepare have prepared employees.
Making disaster preparedness a part of our regular lives keeps it simple and cost effective. 

There are literally thousands of subtle, simple and economical things we can do to drastically
improve our emergency readiness. The notion that it might be expensive or complicated has 
come from companies that aggressively market high-priced, unnecessary gear.
Truth: With the right mix of investments, incentives and leadership, 
a business can radically reduce its risk of disasters.

What needs to happen to ensure risk and suffering is minimized 
for those affected by natural disasters?
    The scope will not be known.  The exact situation will not be known until well into the event.
 Some of the worst-hit areas might be the last to be responded to.  Decisions will have to be  made in the absence of complete information.
    Communications will fail.  There are over 30 types of communications failures; most large  emergencies will suffer multiple types of communication failure.   From infrastructure  damage, to system overload, to information not getting to the person or not arriving in  time to misunderstanding what someone else said, communications will fail.
    Situation constantly changing.  What you are responding to might have significantly changed by  the time you actually arrive on scene.  The events of 9/11 offer an example of how quickly  things can change from the start to the finish of an event.
    Emergency services will be affected.  A police car is no better than a passenger vehicle when whiteout conditions occur on a highway.   Flooding blocks the road for an ambulance as  much as any vehicle.  A fire hall is equally likely to be damaged by a tornado as any structure.
    Unusual response required.  If the emergency services are affected, then alternate strategies might be required.  Disasters commonly have pictures of someone doing something unexpected, but  successfully, when your regular response isn’t working.
    Massive Convergence. Convergence of organizations, volunteers, off-duty personnel, government officials and outside media can be truly breathtaking, with hundreds of organizations arriving for a major emergency, let alone a disaster.   Emergency services are often unprepared for the size of the response in support of their operation.